Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Wednesday, 28 September 2016

14th Demi-Brigade Legere and French Line Grenadiers, 1790s

Have been working on my French Revolutionary army. Finally completed the first eight of my own castings portraying the 14th Demi-Brigade Legere, in their distinctive mirliton hats. And also topped up a line grenadier unit to sixteen figures. MGB

7 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Yes, the 14th Legere does have a distinctive headdress for an infantry unit. Have cast up another 12 but I will need to convert the officers etc.
      Michael

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  2. Very natty headwear indeed and bsolutely splendid as always. Making your own castings?...Thats interesting. Probably quite time consuming though I suppose.

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    Replies
    1. Hi CB, it is time consuming making a mould, with no guarantee it will work, and then the time it takes to cast, but the 14th Legere is rather special in their mirlitons. As I make uniform buttons for living-history displays it was logical to try and do both.
      Michael

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  3. When did the 14th continue to wear the mirliton till?

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