Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Monday, 9 January 2017

British Royal Artillery 18pdrs for 1793-1796

For far too long my British-Emigre artillery train for the French Revolutionary Wars comprised a modest 12pdr, two 6pdrs, two 3pdrs, a medium howitzer, and a light galloper gun. In almost every game the British were unable to stem the tide of numerous French battalions attacking in column because the British artillery had little or no impact. Well my Royal Artillery has now been reconstituted and can now muster four 18pdrs, a medium howitzer, and the light galloper gun. There is also a potential of two Dutch 12pdrs, and two Royal Navy 18pdrs. This is a 'real' artillery train, with the ability to hold positions and besiege French positions. The gunners too have also received some improved paintwork. (The original light and medium guns are to be transferred to my Royal Artillery for the AWI, and are much more appropriate for that period.)
MGB


10 comments:

  1. That will knock those dam Frenchies back, what what!
    Dave.

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    1. Well Dave, if twenty French battalions attack, most in column, I am hoping one or two might break at a distance from these guns, the Allies are typically outnumbered by 2 or 3 times their own number.
      Michael

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  2. Replies
    1. Thank you Allan, fed up with 3 and 6pdr cannon. Something had to be done lol.
      Michael

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  3. Well! 18 pounders ought to slow or at least discourage French enthusiasm!

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    1. I hope so, Jonathan. The 3pdr and 6pdr cannon just don't have the power to stop the numbers of French conscripts, and its all too late for the muskets. That Demi-brigade system really does work. But I was really disillusioned how redoubts were also being stormed because the fortified guns were too ineffective. This will balance things a little, and will add to siege and West Indian scenarios.
      Michael

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  4. Delightful looking chaps. You simply cannot have enough muzzles for cthe enemy to look into.
    Very impressive.

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    1. Thanks CB, it was about time I had some decent artillery pieces for this period.
      Michael

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  5. Another splendid post, your pictures are really impressive, details just perfect!

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    1. Thank you Phil, I feel a lot safer with these 18pdrs lol.
      Michael

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