Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Monday, 12 March 2018

The Coldstream Regiment of Foot Guards c.1775

Another unit joins my Crown army for the 1770s. Having just received their crimson colours, the Coldstream Guards carry out their field exercises. Note the white full gaiters, on formal occasions the Guards were permitted to wear white, the line regiments having abandoned such. These are Hezzlewood castings, occasionally referred to as the X-Range.
MGB




8 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Most kind, Jonathan. I felt His Britannic Majesty's Foot Guards should look appropriately attired.
      Michael

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  2. Replies
    1. Thanks Allan, old Hinchcliffe castings, but still elegant.
      Michael

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  3. These look very smart indeed, Michael, just wonderful. Is that officer third from left modelled on you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, Chris, not with the state of my back these days, perhaps ten years ago! Cheers.
      Michael

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  4. Another smart addition. The Coldstream landed at Callantshoog in 1799... I read that they found the remains of a guardsman not so long ago whilst doing construction work. they identified his regiment from the buttons.

    regards
    CB

    ReplyDelete