Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Sunday, 17 June 2018

Claude Louis Raoul de La Chatre, commander of the Regiment Loyal Emigrant c.1793

I wanted to represent this prominent Royalist in my British-Emigre army of the 1790s. Here he is in a somewhat dated style of coat, and the popular wide-brimmed hat adopted by the Allied army while in the Low Countries. His regiment, the Loyal Emigrant, was well regarded and had a superb fighting record. Still clearing away items in my spares box, I thought something suitably Roman Catholic would not look out of place next to this officer (Well that is one less Christmas decoration lol.)
MGB






4 comments:

  1. Always nice to put the christmas decorations to some serious usage.
    Lovely figure Michael.

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    1. Thanks CB, a friend kindly gave me the old AWI figure (with one of my cast hats). While the XMAS decoration has worked nicely IMHO.
      Michael

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  2. A splendid uniform and a fantastic vignette, congrats!

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    1. Cheers Phil, the war-game comes a poor second to the visual effect of seeing the miniatures on the table, and vignettes add so much value.
      Michael

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