Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Saturday, 4 July 2015

FRENCH WHITE-COAT BATTALIONS c.1792

Work has limited my spare time to paint up miniatures but I have just allowed myself a spell to re-vamp some of the white-coated figures restored to my collection. I'm pleased to report that three battalions are now pretty well ready for the wargames table, only awaiting to be issued their regimental colours. I've decided to paint up the 1792 pre-amalgam style flags despite the likelihood of them forming a centre battalion for Line demi-brigades. These figures can be utilised to provide French regulars for several earlier conflicts (for wargame purposes) so I will keep the white cross of Saint Denis with distinctive cantons which was so much a feature of French military flags in the 18th century.


Two more 'blanc' battalions still to complete, and my box of spares may well provide two more 'bleu' battalions. MGB

7 comments:

  1. Think about leaving the figures wth just the holes drilled in the hands giving you the ability to replace different flags depending on whch period your doing. I didn't but it's on my to do list. Nice figures by the way.
    Dave.

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    1. Thanks for the comment, Dave. To be honest, the Saint Denis flags were redesigned in September 1791 and became obsolete in 1793, (official)y. So they did see service in the FRW. They aren't the same as the SYW/AWI flags, as they ARE colour-linked to their regimental facings, which I quite like. But the style is very 18th century. I know what you are saying, I think those that have 'imaginary-nations' should consider your answer, or even invest in a second command base with authentic flags. For the record, my ships already have the option of replacing their flags. The former will be French FRW, or American AWI. Michael

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  2. They look even better arrayed for battle Michael. I really like your tents and other camp paraphernalia (like the just visible wagon). A nice touch!
    James

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    1. Thanks James, I had to work on the muskets, face-hands, and tidy up the white as the old enamels/varnish had dulled somewhat. The acrylic-white highlighting has worked well and I'm very pleased to have them back. The tents I made of card, several prints showing them striped, and I hope to post something more on this. Michael

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  3. A splendid sight indeed. These chaps will look grand marching through the low countries. I am looking forward to seeing them in action.
    You also have a very nice basing technique. My compliments sir.

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    1. Thanks Captain Brummel, I too am keen to see these battalions on active service, even if I have a bias towards good King George. Its an old and tested system of basing. All purpose ready-mix filler, wood glue the sand and stones, paint with emulsion paint, highlight and paint stones, wood glue some flock. I normally do a fair number in one batch, the first is then dry and ready for the next action. Michael

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  4. These figures and units look gorgeous - well done!

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