Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Thursday, 14 January 2016

Devonshire Volunteers c1794

My British 1790s army recently gained a new addition when I finally completed the Sidmouth Volunteers. With their bearskin-crested top hats, and blue faced with yellow jackets they are quite colourful, and will add to any scenarios involving French landings. MGB


8 comments:

  1. Very nice. What resources do you use to find the units and their uniforms for these years?

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    1. AP, in the late 1980s I took off eighteen months to study the defence of Devon during 1794-1802. It was a very irregular search with no guarantee of finding uniforms, but you can start with your county records office. MGB

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  2. That sounds like an interesting project. Alas, I'm in the USA so my county records for where I live start in the mid 1800s and any military uniforms for those wont be as cool as those you painted. :)

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    1. AP, thanks for the kind comment. It may interest you to know that the defence of Devon was placed under the command of General Simcoe, formerly of the Queen's American Rangers. He disliked the Volunteers wearing blue and in 1798 ordered them to change over to red like the Devonshire Militia regiments. He did, however, allow a few volunteer companies to stay in green. Michael

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  3. A very unusual looking unit and superbly done as always.Thank you for the above historical insight. I personally love figures in blue (but as an ex Hussar that's not surprising is it?) :-)

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    1. Volunteer companies and troops of yeomanry cavalry were raised in large numbers in 1794. As they only got a small allowance towards their uniforms, most bought their own, often very expensive, and in blue, to distinguish them from the Regulars and County militia. Pleased you like them CB. Michael

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  4. Another lovely looking unit Michael.

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    1. Thanks James, it's a fun unit to have in the collection, might raise a few more. Michael

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