Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

Followers

Friday, 13 October 2017

British Corps of Marines at Greenwich

In addition to wargaming the French Revolutionary Wars, I also founded and run a living history group portraying Captain Pellew's Landing Party, being a detachment of Royal Navy and British marines c.1793. Earlier this year we were commissioned to support, over four days, a tall ships event in London. Those visiting the event must have numbered tens of thousands, and some fine photos were taken of our living history display. Imagine the surprise when having a chat with a wargaming friend, Chris Gregg, it turns out that he had spent some time photographing our portrayal with neither of us being aware of each others attendance. Here are a few photos taken of this event, including some by Chris. May I also invite followers to visit his own blog as he has a reputation for painting military subjects, and special commissions can be negotiated. (See Links)
MGB






4 comments:

  1. Yes Michael that was most amusing when we found out months later. Thank you for the plug, here is my email if anyone wants to get in touch, chrisgregg173@gmail.com. and my art website
    http://cheltenham-art.com/chrisgregg2.htm

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    1. Very happy to promote your own fine artistry.
      Michael

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  2. Very fine indeed, smart turnout! I just love the Georgian period too.

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    1. I agree, the Georgian age is something special, its the first period where the middle and artisan classes in Britain could seek to be fashionable lol.
      Michael

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