Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Sunday, 17 December 2017

Dutch Hussars arrive to stem the French Invasion c1793

Finally, the Dutch are now able to furnish some cavalry to support the three understrength British mounted units. But its still nowhere near the number the Revolutionaries can field. This regiment numbered less than 250 men and were often referred to as the Red Hussars.



Well don't ask me why, bought this in a charity shop for £3. I blame Allan at the Wittenberg Blog for the purchase. But I do have a feeling there are some fun projects lurking in this model, and I still have a fair number of fine cast wheels etc in my spares box. Happy Christmas!
MGB

13 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you sir, and the same to you and your kin.
      Michael

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  2. Lovely hussars - nice Xmas parade too

    Merry Xmas to you and yours

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    1. Thanks Allan, often visit Wittenberg for a short break. Have a great Christmas!
      Michael

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  3. Lovely unit and a brilliant setting.

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    1. Thank you Robbie, have a glorious Wassail!
      Michael

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  4. Fantastic as usual Michael, your really getting stuck into your Revolutionary stuff . I must get back to mine when I get time, they really need refurbishing and sorting out.
    Dave.

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    1. Thanks Dave, to be honest, I really hate having a pile of lead sitting around, and when you discover a distinctive uniform for the period, its time to go to work. Best wishes for Christmas.
      Michael

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    2. Same to you mate,keep up the good work.
      Dave.

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  5. Love the red and white hussars, Michael, I must do some for Grunburg! Period setting looks great but your last pic reminds me too much that my Christmas will be shattered by the clatter of grandchildren's feet and voices. Hope you have a good one. Chris
    http://notjustoldschool.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. Thank you Chris. Some of us moan when people turn up, and we moan just as loudly when they don't lol. Have a glorious Wassail, even if its rather loud.
      Michael

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  6. A fine splash of red, really striking on the table. The last picture reminds me of a certain Squadron in my old Regiment.
    I will would like to wish you avery happy Christmas, peace,happiness and good health to you...and thank you for this highly inspiring and thoroughly enjoyable blog.

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    1. CB, The Prussian army was parading before Frederick the Great, one regiment got out of step and lost all order, the colonel went mad reprimanding them. Whereupon Frederick pointed out, not to worry, it was always an excellent regiment on the battlefield. So I shall refrain from commenting further on that squadron. Thanks, CB, for your support of this blog, and have a great Christmas!
      Michael

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