Wargame Rules


RAISING MINIATURE ARMIES FOR THE LATE 18TH CENTURY

I am very keen to keep my wargame rules as simple as possible yet capture the character of the 1790s. Accordingly, most of the French troops are 'levee' battalions, which I have chosen to base in column as their ability to change formation on a battlefield must have been limited, nor do I believe their volley fire had any great value. Of better quality, able to change formation, will be white-coated regular and blue-coated volunteer battalions aided by a fair number of skirmishers. The British, Austrian, Dutch and German armies are often outnumbered, but they maintain the discipline and order of typical 18th century armed forces. Interestingly, French revolutionary cavalry have little in common with their later Napoleonic counterparts, the former are few in number, often poorly mounted, and no match for those in the service of the Allies.

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Tuesday, 2 January 2018

More chasseurs and terrain features 28mm

A small break has seen several new items completed for the table. While the Allies recently gained some hussars, the Republicans have gained a third regiment of chasseurs a cheval, the 16th Regiment in their distinctive pale blue facings, more of my own castings.

Two terrain items are finished. The first is a small lake or, if you prefer, a large pond. Pleased to clear some bits and pieces from my spares box for this. The second is just a bit of fun. Its actually a Christmas decoration with flashing lights, costing only £1 in a charity shop, could not resist it. Constructing a base for the cylinder that holds the batteries was not difficult, modelling clay and wine bottle corks for the most part, with access through the mdf base. Rumour has it, it will mainly appear on my other blog, with the Renaissance Muscovites, should boost their morale!
Happy New Year!
MGB





10 comments:

  1. Love the blue facings on those Chasseurs! I try and hit the craft stores for boxing week to pick up terrain items on sale, I like your tree.

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    1. Thanks Peter. It is fun to find something odd, of little value to others, ultimately become something useful for the table! Could not catch the flashing lights when I switched it on, but it does make you smile.
      Michael

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  2. Can you tell me a little about where you got the houses from in the previous post?
    Inspiring figures and set up as ever.
    Alan

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    1. Alan, I made all my own with the exception of one resin casting of a Dutch house. I enjoy using different thicknesses of card, matchsticks, balsa, odds and scraps. And I am on a budget. At first they were single models, then I began to stick them together to form parades or streets, with pavements. I guess you could say, my town has developed.
      Michael

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  3. Great looking terrain pieces,well done.

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    1. Thanks Robbie, happy new year to you.
      Michael

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  4. All looking very smart Michael - love the lake in particular

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    1. Thanks Chris, its only taken me thirty years to sort out a pond.
      Michael

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  5. More fantastic stuff.
    And those facings look really sharp on those green uniforms. A dashing unit indeed!

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    1. Thanks CB, but British HQ are in a state of panic, the Allied cavalry is very low in number, and only one Dutch regiment is ready for service. Potentially, the republicans can field about 100 cavalry, I doubt the allies would number 30............. urgent steps are needed to redress this imbalance.
      Michael

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